enough of never enough

7372321_14564273372092_rId10.jpgWhen did it start? How did it happen? Was it childhood? Doesn’t it always come back to childhood? Surely, that was it. Although, maybe not. After all, I never went to bed hungry. I always got everything on my birthday list. The lights were never out and the house was always warm. By those standards, I always was taken care and had enough. A deeper, no-nonsense part of my brain that maybe I don’t want to listen to right now on my first cup of coffee says, “But did you have enough love?” Damn, girl.  I don’t know. Probably not. But whatever it is, I have a brain that tells me I don’t have enough.

Scarcity feels like a shameful and dramatic word for an American like me to use. Like here we are in the land of endless crap with more people than ever. How could we possibly feel scarcity? Google news search “scarcity” and you’ll come up with some places that deserve that word.  Places in India with water scarcity or inner city areas facing a teacher scarcity. That’s some real shit. My buried deep inside of me scarcity, and I know this already, comes solely from me. My scarcity exists because I let it. If I am not hysterical and if I am willing to see the truth I know for a fact that I have house, food to eat, regular income, medical care, etc. Still, as an addict, who lived so long waiting for the next high, re-wiring my brain out of scarcity mode is fucking hard.

I promised last year when I started this conversation with you that I would talk about everything. Thus here we are talking about finances, careers, jobs and other sorts of things that make me feel icky. Which is funny because I have no problem blurting out 700 words about doing meth or feeling insane but talking about this stuff feels particularly vulnerable. I don’t know why. I guess because I have this notion that as a person my age should have their shit together financially. My ego wants you to think I’m some baller or that the very least a person who doesn’t have single digits in their bank account. Yet the real truth is I’ve always been pretty terrible in the financial department. Naturally, as an addict I have the myriad of overdrawn accounts, evictions and bad checks in my past. But now 8.5 years sober, I still struggle to balance my finances and currently making enough money.

Since moving, my employment status has been all over the place. Piecing together freelance writing gigs and side job shenanigans has been harder than I thought it would be. Sure, some of it, as my husband reminds me, is the new city deal. I moved here, unlike him whose job brought him here, without a job. Therefore, he assures me, it’s normal that I’d have a period of readjusting. And he’s right. Plus, it isn’t like I’ve had zero opportunities and no money coming in. Just not enough to really cover my bills. I’ve been proactive in the meantime, however. I’ve applied for tons of other jobs, submitted writing to all kinds of places and I’ve signed up for every depressing and bleak job website and their respective (and equally terrible) email newsletters. In general, I’ve run around like a crazy person to make it click, to make this click, to make me click into a place where I feel like I’m contributing and where I don’t have to worry. And the result? Nada.

So many “no”, “no thank you” and plain old no response answers have beaten me into a place of submission. I’ve even readjusted the goals, widened the net and tried different things. And the answer has universally still been the same. Sigh like for two hours sigh. Yesterday, I had a moment. It was a hard moment but a good moment. In this little moment of mine, it hit me. It wasn’t that there isn’t enough jobs or enough money or that the city of Portland is conspiring against me from financially succeeding. It was me. It was this broken brain hell-bent on scarcity that was causing the issues. Damn, girl: the sequel. “Things” were not going to change unless I changed my thinking.

Oh goody. Another opportunity for painful spiritual growth. I’m thrilled. Yet it feels like the only way. The external is not budging and doing what I want it to do, the hateful bastard. So it’s up to me. And to be completely honest I am not even sure what this will look like. More meditation, more faith, more gratitude all seem like the place to start.  Changing my bitch ass attitude about the jobs I do have and about the money I do have coming in is another thing I can do too. But the rest of? Honeychild, I really don’t know. But what I know is this: I’m hitting a bottom around this lie of scarcity and this fraud that I don’t have enough or that I am not enough. And from what I know about hitting bottom, it’s an excellent place to start and the only way from here is up.

 

 

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9 comments

  1. Gayle · 27 Days Ago

    Your honesty inspires me towards fierce and fearless assessment of my own state of mind, Sean. Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Untipsyteacher · 27 Days Ago

    Hi Sean!
    My favorite lines are “Oh goody. Another opportunity for painful spiritual growth. I’m thrilled.” That applies to me, too! I see a scarcity in having friends. And you are SO right…how many friends do I need?
    Thank you!
    xo
    Wendy

    Liked by 1 person

    • seanpaulmahoney · 27 Days Ago

      Thanks Wendy! I get that with friends too. I freaked out when all my old drinking buddies vanished when I first got sober and was really heartbroken. But now I have a small group of cherished folks and I feel incredibly blessed to do so.
      hugs,
      S.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Phil Taylor · 27 Days Ago

    I can’t add any comments or advice. Your advice to yourself is spot on.

    Like

  4. Phil Taylor · 27 Days Ago

    I can’t add any comment or advice. Your advice to yourself was spot on.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Paul S · 25 Days Ago

    I have fears around finances too – and I never used to have them. In fact, my wife is making more and more every year working for herself and I just got a promotion with some more money. But why the financial fears? I don’t know. I think they are a reflection of a part of me, of not being “enough”…so this post really speaks to me at a deep level. And you did a marvellous job at this post, Sean. Deep, insightful, witty and full of humility. I think it’s one of my faves.

    Thank you – I know things will turn out for you. You are worth it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • seanpaulmahoney · 25 Days Ago

      Thank you so much, Paul. I believe that too at the end of the day. It’s just getting my crazy brain to stop lying in the meantime😜

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: action! I wanna live. | seanologues

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